Training Plan
5k-10k Off-Season Build-up Standard Plan (12 Weeks)

This is a 12-week training plan for runners who are preparing for an upcoming 5k or 10k racing season. It is not a typical “base” training plan that focuses on just mileage. This plan integrates stamina workouts (Tempo, Threshold, and CV), hill reps, striders, long runs, and recovery runs. If you need personalized coaching from Coach Schwartz, here is the weblink: www.runfastcoach.com (see the Coaching Services tab). Note, prior to participating in an exercise plan, it is advisable to have a thorough medical exam from a sports medicine physician or cardiologist. If you are over the age of 35, it is recommended that you have a stress test administered by a cardiologist to ensure you are healthy.

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Sample Week of Training

Other - Intellectual Property

Do not copy or distribute this training plan in full or partial in accordance with intellectual property rights laws.

Run - Easy paced long run on trails or other soft surfaces

- 70-minutes easy-paced long run (on a smooth trail is ideal).

- Do not push the pace too hard! The pace is generally in

- You may run on the TM (treadmill) if the weather is not good, but use a 1% grade to simulate overground air drag.

- How slow should you run?

- A good rule of thumb is adding 2:00 per mile to today's 5k race pace.

- If you use the metric system, add 1:15 per km to today's 5k race pace.

- The effort should feel comfortable.

Planned: 1:10:00

Strength Training - Core Training

- Planks of various kinds, back extensions, leg lifts, etc.

- You can find good information on core strengthening exercise in the following books:

- Build Your Running Body
- New Functional Strength Traning for Sports

Run - - 6 x 20-seconds striders @ 2-mile to 800m speed

- 40-minute run, including ...
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- 6 x 20-seconds @ 2-mile to 1-mile race speed/effort (jog 40-second recoveries) starting at the half-way point of the assigned total time.
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- Overall, the running pace is mostly easy except for the fartlek striders.

- Never force the speed during the striders. Let your body gradually adapt to the quicker pace.
Your coordination and rhythm will improve from one rep to the next if you are patient and let it happen naturally.

- Always run the first two or three striders slower; thus giving your body a chance to adjust to the next power and technical form demand of faster running.

Planned: 40:00

Run - - 5 x 3-minutes @ CV intensity + 5 x 30-seconds hill reps

- 60 minutes of total running.
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- Warm-up

- 5-minutes @ Recovery Pace +
- 5-minutes @ Easy Pace +
- 5-minutes @ Moderate Pace.

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- Main workout:

- 5 x 3 minutes @ CV effort or pace.
(jog 1 minute at recovery pace or slower between reps) +

- Jog 5-minutes to a hill. Then, run...

- 5 x 30-seconds hill reps @ 800m race effort or about 90% of your top sprinting speed
(jog 30-seconds between reps on the downhill)
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- Cool-down:

- After the last rep, run slowly until the assigned total time is completed.
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- CV is 30-35 minute race speed. The exact pace can be found in the Tinman Running Calculator located on the Final Surge website, or on the www.runfastcoach.com website. However, estimating, for now, is good enough to get the job done.

- Side-step the mistake of pushing the pace too fast on the CV segments.

- The goal of CV training is to boost the aerobic (oxygen use) ability of your fast intermediate muscle fibers, which respond well to the intensity near or just above your respiratory compensation point (equivalent to the lactate threshold/lactate turn point).

Planned: 1:00:00

Strength Training - Core Training

- Planks of various kinds, back extensions, leg lifts, etc.

- You can find good information on core strengthening exercise in the following books:

- Build Your Running Body
- New Functional Strength Traning for Sports

Run - Slow recovery running

- 30-minute easy run on flat terrain and soft
surfaces, if possible.

- You may run on the TM (treadmill) if the weather is not good, but use a 1% grade to simulate overground air drag.

- How slow should you run? A good rule of thumb is adding 2:00 to 2:30 per mile to today's 5k race pace. If you use the metric system, add 1:15 to 1:33 per km to today's 5k race pace.

- The effort should feel like jogging!

Planned: 30:00

Run - - 6 x 20-seconds striders @ 2-mile to 800m speed

- 40-minute run, including ...
-------------------------------------------------------------------
- 6 x 20-seconds @ 2-mile to 1-mile race speed/effort (jog 40-second recoveries) starting at the half-way point of the assigned total time.
-------------------------------------------------------------------
- Overall, the running pace is mostly easy except for the fartlek striders.

- Never force the speed during the striders. Let your body gradually adapt to the quicker pace.
Your coordination and rhythm will improve from one rep to the next if you are patient and let it happen naturally.

- Always run the first two or three striders slower; thus giving your body a chance to adjust to the next power and technical form demand of faster running.

Planned: 40:00

Run - 2-km @ 97% effort to re-assess your aerobic power and set up training paces

- 60-minute run including a ...
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- Run slowly for 10-15 minutes, and then run...

- 10-minutes @ tempo pace
(5k pace + 45-seconds per mile or + 28-seconds per km) +

- Jog 3-minutes, and then run...

- 2-km at 97% effort to test your current maximum aerobic power.

- Be sure to run the first 800m of the test conservatively so that you have success.
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- After the test run, hydrate before running easily as you complete the assigned total time.
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*You can easily determine your training paces or race equivalents for your location, weather, and state of fatigue based on the 2km test. Just predict what your 100% effort time would be and then input the information to the Tinman Running Calculator located on the Final Surge website.

- Select 2000m from the drop-down menu. Then, and input your time (minutes and seconds), and click on the update button.

- Next, scroll down to see your personalized training paces.

- Located below the training paces table is our equivalent race times. Note that the race distances closest to the test distances will be most accurately predicted. To obtain a broader scale understanding of your fitness, you will need to test at more than one distance. A performance profile using advanced mathematics can be calculated by Coach Schwartz (Tinman). Send inquiries to www.runfastcoach.com for the testing protocol, analysis, and pricing. Note that recommendations are provided in the analysis.

Planned: 1:00:00

Strength Training - Core Training

- Planks of various kinds, back extensions, leg lifts, etc.

- You can find good information on core strengthening exercise in the following books:

- Build Your Running Body
- New Functional Strength Traning for Sports

Run - Slow recovery running

- 30-minute easy run on flat terrain and soft
surfaces, if possible.

- You may run on the TM (treadmill) if the weather is not good, but use a 1% grade to simulate overground air drag.

- How slow should you run? A good rule of thumb is adding 2:00 to 2:30 per mile to today's 5k race pace. If you use the metric system, add 1:15 to 1:33 per km to today's 5k race pace.

- The effort should feel like jogging!

Planned: 30:00


How It Works

When you purchase this training plan, your plan will automatically get loaded into the Final Surge training calendar for you to use as many times as you want. Final Surge allows you to view and track your training, record distance and duration, upload data from Garmin and other fitness devices, and much more. Use the Final Surge mobile app to view your training plan on the go and record your workouts. Each night your workout for the upcoming day will be emailed to you so that it is sitting in your inbox the next morning.